Dawoud Bey: Photography and The Black Subject

Since the mid-1970s, Dawoud Bey (b. 1953) has worked to expand upon what photography can and should be. Insisting that it is an ethical practice requiring collaboration with his subjects, he creates poignant meditations on visibility, power, and race. Bey chronicles communities and histories that have been largely underrepresented or even unseen, and his work lends renewed urgency to an enduring conversation about what it means to represent America with a camera.

Spanning from his earliest street portraits in Harlem to his most recent series imagining an escape from slavery on the Underground Railroad, Dawoud Bey: An American Project attests to the artist’s profound engagement with the Black subject. He is deeply committed to the craft of photography, drawing on the medium’s specific tools, processes, and materials to amplify the formal, aesthetic, and conceptual goals of each body of work. Bey views photography not only as a form of personal expression but as an act of political responsibility, emphasizing the necessary and ongoing work of artists and institutions to break down obstacles to access, convene communities, and open dialogues.

Dawoud Bey: An American Project is co-organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. The exhibition is co-curated by Elisabeth Sherman, assistant curator at the Whitney, and Corey Keller, curator of photography at SFMOMA.

A Girl with School Medals, Brooklyn, NY, 1988.COURTESY OF DAWOUD BEY AND MACK.
Sunshine Bracey and a Friend, Brooklyn, NY, 1990.
 COURTESY OF DAWOUD BEY AND MACK.

Dawoud Bey (born David Edward Smikle; 1953) is an American photographer and educator known for his large-scale art photography and street photography portraits, including American adolescents in relation to their community, and other often marginalized subjects.

NEVAHBLACKDOWN is proud to share information on this most profound of photographers. His work embodies the truth and beauty of black people. Anyone seeing his work can dive into his world and stand alongside his lens to become a part of something that has and will leave an indelible mark on culture and society. The conversation is apparently necessary when viewing the photos. The beauty is important to discuss and the power behind each and every one of the photos is masterfully giving us the audience a place to revel in and peel back the discordant layers of society.

NEVAHBLACKDOWN

nevahblackdown

We are a group of passionate artists and creatives who believe in telling and sharing inspiring stories.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s